Interdisciplinary Studies

Academic Opportunities

The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies allows students to combine two areas of study into one degree. The different areas of study are tied together by a specifically designed interdisciplinary core. The interdisciplinary options also include a specifically designed degree plan for students interested in pre-med, pre-physician assistant, or pre-law.

Career Opportunities

More than ever, professional employers and many post-baccalaureate academic programs seek graduates who have diverse backgrounds in the liberal arts and the skills to think critically, communicate effectively, and perform a broad range of tasks. For this reason, the diversity of a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies uniquely prepares students for a number of different career and vocational pursuits. With the right combination of concentrations, the degree plan is especially designed for students interested in preparing for medical school, law school, or graduate school in philosophy, religion, theatre, or other liberal arts fields.
In addition, this degree plan offers students with professional interests an opportunity to develop a broad intellectual resource base as well as the reasoning, speaking, and writing skills sought by many employers.

 

Minors

Courses required for a minor cannot concurrently apply toward courses within the degree core, major, concentration, or track. With department approval, students may use other courses, within the area of study, to substitute duplicate requirements.

At least 50% of a student’s minor core requirements must be earned at Rochester College. Rochester College only awards minors listed in this catalog.

  • Art Minor – Requires 12 hours from ART 1413 or 1423, ART 2413, ART 4123, and PHI 4413 and 6 hours selected from ART 2213 (repeatable), ART 2233, ART 3213 (repeatable), ART 3313, and ART 4123 (repeatable), and JRN 2883.
  • Honors Leadership Minor – Requires 9 Honors credits in LDR 3653, SEN 2013, and THL 2013; 6 hours from HON 2014, 2113, 2213, 2314, 3113, or 3213; and 3 hours from an honors contract selected from the following courses: BUS 3003, COM 2223, JRN 4333, JRN 4313, LDR 3713, LDR 3633, SEN 3003, or SMG 4253 with a minimum of 9 upper division hours.
  • Humanities Minor – Requires 6 hours from COM or ENG; 6 hours from ART, FLM, MUS, or THE; 6 hours from GEO, HIS, INS, PHI, or POS with a minimum of 9 upper division hours.
  • International Studies Minor – Requires participation in one of Rochester College’s international programs through Global Educational Opportunities (GEO); at least 6 hours of the same foreign language; at least 6 hours of liberal arts courses taken in a GEO international program; 3 hours (which cannot overlap with one’s IDS core, major core, or the general education core) from BIB 4123, BUS 3033, COM 3533, HIS 3313, 3323, 4323; 3 hours (which cannot overlap with one’s IDS core, major core, or the general education core) from ENG 2413, 4413, GEO 3113, HIS 3423, MIN 2401/2/3, MUS 3333, PHI 3043, 3923.

Concentrations

Art Concentration »

 
ART 1413 or 1423 Drawing I or II3 
ART 2413 Principles of Design3
ART 4123 Art History (repeatable)3
PHI/INS 4413 Aesthetics3
CHOOSE FOUR FROM:

  • ART 1413 or 1423 Drawing I or II
  • ART 2213 Fine Arts Studio (repeatable)
  • ART 2233 Introduction to Art Therapy
  • ART 3213 Fine Arts Studio (repeatable)
  • ART 3313 Painting
  • ART 4123 Art History (repeatable)
  • ART 4213 Fine Arts Studio (repeatable)
  • JRN 2883 Digital Photography
12
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

 

Business Concentration

 
ACC 2113 Accounting I3 
ACC 2123 Accounting II3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • BUS 2403 Macroeconomics
  • BUS 2413 Microeconomics
3
BUS 3003 Business Communication3
BUS 3303 Business Law3
FIN 3203 Principles of Finance3
MGT 2603 Principles of Management3
MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

General Science Concentration

 
SELECT ONE Laboratory Science sequence (another sequence must be included in the General Education core):

  • BIO 1014 AND 1024 Biological Science I and II
  • CHE 1314 AND 1315 Introduction to Chemistry I and II
  • CHE 1514 AND 1524 College Chemistry I and II
  • PHS 2014 AND 2024 General Physics I and II
8 
CHOOSE 14 HOURS:

  • BIO 2114 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
  • BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology
  • BIO 3214 General Ecology
  • BIO 3324 Microbiology
  • BIO 3334 Exercise Physiology
  • BIO 3414 Genetics
  • BIO 3513 Cell Biology
  • CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHE 2524 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHE 3514 Biochemistry I
  • NSC 1004 Earth Science
  • NSC 1013 Environmental Science
  • NSC 2204 Natural Science Field Study
  • NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters
  • NSC 4901, 4902, OR 4903 Special Topics in Science
  • NSC 4513 Natural Science Internship
  • PHS 2004 Astronomy
  • Laboratory Science sequence from above
14 
NSC 4612 Senior Seminar2 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

History Concentration

 
CHOOSE THREE:

  • HIS 1313 Western Civilization to 1500
  • HIS 1323 Western Civilization Since 1500
  • HIS 2513 United States History to 1877
  • HIS 2523 United States History Since 1877
9 
CHOOSE FIVE WITH NO MORE THAN 3 HOURS LOWER DIVISION:

  • HIS 2113 Michigan History
  • HIS 2213 History of the Early Church
  • HIS 2413 World History
  • HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era
  • HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
  • HIS 3423 Globalization and the Developing World
  • HIS 3503 Women in American History
  • HIS 3513 History of American Foreign Relations
  • HIS 3523 Colonial and Revolutionary America
  • HIS 3533 The Early American Republic
  • HIS 3543 The Rise of Industrial America
  • HIS 3553 America in World Crises
  • HIS 3813 Historical Research and Writing
  • HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars
  • HIS 4333 Europe since 1945
  • HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era
  • HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 to Present
  • HIS 4613 Selected Topics in History
15
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Honors Leadership Concentration

 
LDR 3653-HON Strategic Leadership Theory and Practice3 
SEN 2013-HON Social Entrepreneurship3
THL 2013-HON Spiritual Formation3
NINE HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • HON 2014 Communication and Critical Thinking
  • HON 2113 The American Experience
  • HON 2213 Global Citizenship
  • HON 2314 Science as Human Enterprise
  • HON 3113 The American Experience: Advanced Studies
  • HON 3213 Global Citizenship: Advanced Studies

These courses are repeatable, so the course titles vary. The same course can be taken twice as long as the titles are different.

9
COMPLETE HONORS CONTRACTS IN TWO OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • BUS 3003 Business Communication
  • COM 2223 Public Speaking and Debate
  • JRN 4333 Editorial Writing
  • JRN 4313 Feature Writing
  • LDR 3713 Leadership of Teams
  • LDR 3633 Conflict Management and Negotiation
  • SEN 3003 Case Studies in Social Entrepreneurship
  • SMG 4253 Facility and Event Management
6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

International Studies Concentration

 
Minimum of six hours of the same foreign language6 
Six hours of liberal arts taken while participating in an RC GEO international program6
CHOOSE SIX HOURS FROM: 

  • BUS 3033 International Business
  • COM 3533 Intercultural Communication
  • HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era
  • HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
  • HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars
  • HIS 4333 Europe since 1945
6
CHOOSE SIX HOURS FROM:

  • ENG 2413 World Literature Survey
  • ENG 4413 Diversity in American Literature
  • GEO 3113 World Regional Geography
  • HIS 3423 Globalization and the Developing World
  • MIN 2401/2/3 Missions Outreach Internship
  • MUS 3333 World Music
  • PHI 3043 Diversity Seminar
  • PHI 3923 World Religions
6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

English Concentration

 
ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis3 
CHOOSE ONE: 

  • ENG 2413 World Literature Survey OR
  • ENG 4413 Diversity in American Literature
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • ENG 3213 British Literature to 1800 OR
  • ENG 3223 British Literature Since 1800
3
CHOOSE ONE: 

  • ENG 3313 American Literature to 1865 OR
  • ENG 3323 American Literature Since 1865
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • ENG 2513 Literature and the Christian Faith
  • ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Fiction
  • ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry
  • ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
3
ENG 3613 Grammar and Linguistics3
ENG 4523 Advanced Composition3
CHOOSE any upper division ENG3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Mass Communication Concentration

 
COM 3013 Communication Theory3 
COM 3533 Intercultural Communication3
MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication3
MED 2513 Media Writing3
PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations3
MED 3003 Media and Society3
MED 3113 New Media Strategies3
MED 4943 Media Ethics3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Mathematics Concentration*

 
MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus4 
MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4
MAT 2524 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II4
MAT 3534 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III4
MAT 3614 Linear Algebra4
MAT 3624 Differential Equations4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

*Students with AP credit in Calcululs must take 6 hours of the following: MAT 2233, 2413, 3303, or 4653.

 

Performing Arts Concentration*

 
MUS 1041 Class Piano, MUS 1203 Music Foundations, AND MUS 1211/3 Ear Training & Theory I*8 
CHOOSE FOUR FROM:

  • any DAN
4
THE 1103 Acting I3
CHOOSE SIX HOURS FROM:

  • THE 3102 Advanced Acting
  • THE 3242 Acting Shakespeare
  • THE 4102 Audition
  • MUS 3403 Conducting
  • MUS 4213 Arranging and Scoring
6
CHOOSE FOUR HOURS FROM:

  • MUS 10X1 Applied Private Lessons
  • MUS 1101 A Cappella Chorus
  • MUS 2101 Worship Ensemble Lab
  • any DAN
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
  • THE 1061 Unarmed Stage Combat
  • THE 2103 Acting II
  • THE 2212 Musical Theatre Workshop
4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

*If student passes music theory placement exam, MUS 1221/1223 or any THE 2000 or above can be used to replace MUS 1041 and 1203 in the degree plan.

 

Pre-Law Concentration

 
CHOOSE ONE:

  • HIS 2513 U.S. History to 1877
  • HIS 3533 Early American Republic
3 
BUS 3303 Business Law3
MED 4113 Media Law3
POS 2023 Introduction to the American Legal System3
POS 2043 Criminal Law and Procedure3
POS 4013 American Constitutional Law3
POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law3
POS 4913 Directed Legal Research3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Professional Writing Concentration

 
ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis3 
ENG 3523 Creative Writing (or three semesters of ENG 3521)3
ENG 3613 Grammar and Linguistics3
ENG 4523 Advanced Composition3
Choose from any upper division JRN3
JRN 2513 Media Writing3
PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations3
PRN 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Psychology Concentration

 
PSY 2013 General Psychology3 
CHOOSE ONE:

  • PSY 2113 Psychology of Adjustment
  • PSY 2223 Life Span Development
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality
  • PSY 3233 Child and Adolescent Development
3
PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology3
CHOOSE FOUR COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING (at least three must be PSY; at least two must be upper division):

  • Any PSY (9-12 hours) OR
  • Choose one from SOC 2453; SWK 2013, 3003, 3103; MIN 3613
12
PSY 4921 Directed Readings in Psychology1
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Social Entrepreneurship Concentration

 
BUS 4813 Business Internship3 
LDR 3653 Strategic Leadership Theory and Practice3
MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior3
MGT 3683 Small Business and Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3723 Nonprofit Management3
SEN 2013 Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship3
SEN 3003 Case Studies in Social Entrepreneurship3
CHOOSE ONE FROM:

  • COM 3533 Intercultural Communication
  • HIS 3423 Globalization of Developing World
  • MIN 2403 Missions Outreach Internship
  • MIN 3423 Issues in Culture and Evangelism
  • MIN 3623 The Church and Society
  • PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations
  • SWK 3003 Human Behavior and Social Environment
  • SWK 3103 Social Welfare and Public Policy
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

Note: MGT 2603 Principles of Management, PDS 2001, and PDS 3001 are waived for non-business majors.

 

Bible

 
BIB 3000 or above textual course9 
BIB 2333 Biblical Study Tools3
BIB 2983 Biblical Inerpretation3
BIB 4394 Contemporary Issues in Hermeneutics4
CHOOSE ONE:

  • THL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I
  • THL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II
3
MIN 3813 Ministry of the Word3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Ministry Concentration

 
BIB 2983 Biblical Interpretation3 
BIB 4394 Contemporary Issues in Hermeneutics4
MIN 2513 Theology of Ministry3
MIN 2613 The Congregation3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • MIN 3613 Pastoral Care
  • MIN 3333 Intro to Youth Ministry
  • MIN3813 Minstry of the Word
3
MIN 3523 Practical Issues in Ministry3
THL 2013 Spiritual Formation3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • THL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I
  • THL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Theatre Concentration

 
CHOOSE 2 COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • THE 1011 Production Practicum
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
2 
THE 2603 Play Analysis3
CHOOSE 2 COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • THE/ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
  • THE 4503 Acting Theory
  • THE 4603 Dramatic Criticism
  • THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to Renaissance
  • THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to Present
6
Choose 10 hours from any THE courses in acting, musical theatre, technical theatre, directing, or design10
THE 3143 Theatre Ministry OR
THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

Courses

ART—ART

ART 1413 Drawing I
Creating convincing images on paper using graphite.  Attention given to technique, process, and composition. Instruction in graphite media and paper. Course fee.

ART 1423 Drawing II
Explores a wide range of various drawing media, including mixed media and collage. Attention given to technique, process, and composition. Instruction in various media and paper. Course fee.

ART 2003 Art Appreciation
An introduction to the visual arts that helps students understand and appreciate a range of media, artists, movements, and periods in history. Includes basic concepts and terminology associated with visual literacy and encourages students to develop judgment in art analysis and criticism.

ART 2233 Introduction to Art Therapy
This course will present an introductory exploration and experience to the field of art therapy. It will introduce the theory, history, principles and practices of art therapy. The interface between art and various theories of psychotherapy will be explored, including applications of art therapy techniques and ethical practices for selected client populations. The course will include concepts of creativity, symbol, and metaphor. Through reading, writing, exam, and lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and individual presentations students will apply theory into art therapy practice experiences. It will include principles and practices of art therapy and the use of art making as a healing modality. A personal art experience and the use of art therapy with a variety of clinical populations. Course fee.

ART 2413 Principles of Design
Application of art elements and design principles in a variety of scenarios. Focus on refining ideas for compositions. Course fee. Also listed as THE 2413. PR: ART 1413 or 1423.

ART 3213 Fine Arts Studio
Offered through Paint Creek Center for the Arts. Options vary by semester and include following: Hand Building and Wheel Throwing, Expiring Fiber Arts, Drawing from Pencil to Pastel, Portrait Drawing and Painting, Figure Drawing and Painting, Exploring Abstract Painting. Course fee $195. PR or CR: ART 2413 or PI.

ART 3313 Painting
Painterly medium for class rotates between acrylic and watercolor depending on year. Attention given to process and technique. Instruction in materials and history of painting. Course may be repeated with a different medium. Course fee $20. PR or CR: ART 2413.

ART 4123 Art History
Study of art-making associated with particular historical periods and locations. Topic varies depending on year. Course may be repeated with a different topic. PR: ENG 1123.

COM—COMMUNICATION

COM 1013 Communication Basics
Theory and practice in a variety of communication contexts, including verbal, nonverbal, perception, and listening. Includes practice in organizing and delivering speeches.

COM 2223 Public Speaking
Public speaking theory and practice. Students prepare, deliver, and evaluate several types of speeches including informative speeches, persuasive speeches, speeches with presentational aids, and debate. PR: C- or better in COM 1013.

COM 2253 Listening
Theory and practice of effective listening in such communication contexts as interpersonal, intercultural, small groups, public, and mass communication.

COM 3013 Communication Theory
Survey of communication theories and models upon which communication studies are built. PR: C- or better in COM 1013 and ENG 1123.

COM 3513 Small Group Communication
Theories and techniques for small groups in various settings. PR: C- or better in COM 1013.

COM 3523 Interpersonal Communication
Elements of communication between two or more persons in family, social, work, church, and computer-mediated settings. PR: C- or better in COM 1013.

COM 3533 Intercultural Communication
Major theories and concepts involved in intercultural communication. Emphasis on increasing awareness of and sensitivity to persons of other cultures and/or co-cultures and improving personal effectiveness in intercultural communication. PR: C- or better in COM 1013.

COM 4613 Special Topics in Communication
Various Communication topics chosen by students or instructor.

COM 4603 Administration of School Programs in Speech
Develops appropriate understanding of co-curricular and extra-curricular application of speech experience in forensics, theatre production, and media. This Capstone course includes preparation and presentation of a portfolio specifically designed for the speech minor. PR: THE 4113

ENG—ENGLISH

ENG 1003 Basic Writing
Practice in the basics of writing: parts of speech, grammar, punctuation, and syntax. Focuses on the writing process and paragraph development. Students are placed in ENG 1003 Basic Writing if they:

  • Score 22 or below on the new SAT Writing and Language exam OR
  • Score 15 or below on the ACT English exam

Students who earn a C or higher in this course progress to ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition.

ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition
Reviews mechanics and introduces students to the writing process and various forms of essay writing. Students are placed in ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition if they:

  • Score a 23 or 24 on the new SAT Writing and Language exam OR
  • Score 16 or 17 on the ACT English test

Students who earn a C or higher in this course progress to ENG 1113 Composition A. Credits earned for ENG 1003 and 1013 are not counted toward graduation requirements.

ENG 1113 College Composition A
Writing and revising expository papers, an annotated bibliography, and researched paper(s). Students read and analyze selected essays and articles. PR: Grade of C or better in ENG 1013. Students are placed in ENG 1113 Composition A if they:

  • Score a 25 or above on the new SAT Writing and Language exam OR
  • Score 18 or above on the ACT English Test

Students who earn a C or higher in this course progress to ENG 1123 Composition B.

ENG 1123 College Composition B
Writing critical essays and researched papers. Examines various forms of literature. PR: C or better in ENG 1113. Students are placed in ENG 1123 Composition B if they:

  • Score a 32 or above on the new SAT Writing and Language exam OR
  • Score of 25 or above on the ACT English Test

Students exempted from ENG 1113 must replace those hours with electives.

ENG 2413 World Literature Survey
A comparative study of literature from a variety of world cultures. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 2513 Literature and Faith
A historical and analytical survey of literature that addresses questions of faith and doubt, emphasizing works by Christian authors. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3213 British Literature To 1800
An analytical study of British writers and literary movements from medieval times to 1800. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3223 British Literature Since 1800
An analytical study of British writers and literary movements from 1800 to the present. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3313 American Literature To 1865
An analytical study of American writers and literary movements from the colonial era to the Civil War. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3323 American Literature Since 1865
An analytical study of American writers and literary movements from the Civil War to the present. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis
Advanced writing course on types of writing used to analyze literature. Analytical application of major literary criticism philosophies. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3521 Creative Writing (Ex Libris)
Creative writing theory and practice in conjunction with Ex Libris activities, including the compilation of the literary journal Blackberry Winter. The course may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours for Creative Writing. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3523 Creative Writing
Creative writing theory and practice in a seminar setting; composition of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and/or drama. Includes sources of creative writing, characteristics of major genres, and processes of revising and editing. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 3613 Grammar and Linguistics
Introduction to language structure and use with a focus on the phonetic, phonemic, morphological, syntactic, and semantic aspects of English. Includes a study of the historical development of English along with discussion and application of prescriptive and descriptive approaches to the language. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4413 Diversity in American Literature
An analytical study of African, Asian, Middle Eastern, Hispanic, and Native American voices in contemporary American literature. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4523 Advanced Composition
Advanced writing and reading of non-fiction with extensive revision and editing. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project
Required capstone course for English majors. Preparation and presentation of a professional writing project approved by the department, assessment of personal learning and program offerings, and preparation of a portfolio. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513; a prerequisite of ENG 3523 or ENG 3521 is required for students desiring to complete a creative writing project.

ENG 4593 Special Topics in English
Various topics in English; offered at the discretion of instructor. PR: ENG 1123 and PI.

ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Fiction
Literary and formal analysis of selected classic short stories and novels. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry
Literary and formal analysis of medieval to contemporary poetry. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
Survey of ancient to contemporary drama with a focus on literary and formal analysis. Also listed as THE 4743. PR: ENG 1123.

ENG 4873 English Internship
Supervised field experience of writing in a professional environment. Includes outside reading and a written report. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, GPA of 3.0 or higher. Responsibility for obtaining an internship lies with the student. The intern must consult the faculty coordinator for approval of the internship.

FLM—FILM

FLM 2013 Film Appreciation
An introduction to the art of film. Includes such topics as film making, early history of the industry, genres, and theories. Students view and analyze a number of films in order to better understand the influence of film on individuals and society.

FLM 2423 Film History
History of the film industry with special attention to influences of the industry and the industry’s influence on history.

GEO—GEOGRAPHY

GEO 1013 Introduction to Geography
A survey of the basic geographic concepts, terms, and methods used in the earth science, cultural-environmental, locational, and area analysis traditions. Emphasizes religion, population, language, traditions, and urbanization.

GEO 3113 World Regional Geography
An examination of the political, economic, cultural, and environmental dynamics that shape the major world regions. Evaluations include Africa, Asia, Anglo-America, Europe, the Commonwealth of Independent States, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands.

GER—GERMAN

GER 1214 Elementary German I
Basic vocabulary, grammar, and practice in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German.

GER 1224 Elementary German II
Vocabulary building and complex grammatical construction. Stresses the spoken language and German culture. PR: GER 1214 or three semesters of high school German.

HIS—HISTORY

HIS 1313 Western Civilization To 1500
Examines important events, people, institutions, and ideas in the foundations of Western civilization. Includes the ancient Near East; Greece; Rome; the spread and influence of Christianity; the Byzantine and Islamic empires; Medieval Europe; and the Renaissance.

HIS 1323 Western Civilization Since 1500
Examines Western development from the Protestant Reformation to the present. Major themes and topics include European overseas empires, religious reform, and warfare; the rise of science and reason; the French Revolutionary era; capitalist, socialist, and nationalist ideologies; industrialization; World Wars; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization.

HIS 2113 Michigan History
Surveys the political, economic, and social development of the state of Michigan from it’s pre-European history to the present. Identifies and examines significant events, people, places, and institutions in Michigan’s past to analyze their meanings and implications.

HIS 2213 History of the Early Church
Survey of the earliest centuries of the Christian church. Considers it’s backgrounds, it’s first-century origins, and it’s development and organization through the second and third centuries. PR: PI

HIS 2413 World History
Surveys the histories of civilizations, cultures, and world regions, and the interactions of peoples and societies over time. In each world region, the development of distinct ways of life, cultural expressions, and basic institutions will be examined to highlight factors which have produced both commonalities and differences in human societies.

HIS 2513 United States History To 1877
Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from colonization through Reconstruction. Includes European settlement and the Atlantic World; the American Revolution, Constitution, and early national debates; democratic and territorial expansion; slavery and the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War.

HIS 2523 United States History Since 1877
Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from the post- Reconstruction period to the present. Topics include the impact of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, rising power, world wars, prosperity, and depression; the Cold War; computers; and globalization.

HIS 3313 The French Revolution And Napoleonic Era
Examines the origins, development, and impact of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire, among the great transforming periods in Western history, highlighting institutional, ideological, and social change. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
Examines political, economic, ideological, social, cultural, and technological developments in Europe from 1815 to World War I. Topics include the Industrial Revolution and its effects, liberalism and democracy, socialism, nationalism, and imperialism. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3423 Globalization And The Developing World
Evaluates patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development in the Developing World: the non-Western societies and states located in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Regional case studies focus on flashpoints within each realm and possible solutions to contemporary issues. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3503 Women In American History
Traces the status and contributions of women in each of the major eras of American history. Examines the roles of leaders and pioneers as well as the changing legal, political, and socio-economic status of the majority of American women, including minorities, and the struggles for suffrage and equality. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3513 History Of American Foreign Relations
Reviews major ideas, episodes, personalities, institutions, and interpretations of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the founding era to the present. Includes issues relating to the Revolutionary War and the early republic; expansionism; the Civil War; imperialism; world conflicts; the Cold War; and globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3523 Colonial And Revolutionary America
Examines the colonial heritage and founding of the United States. Major topics include European colonization; English colonial politics, societies, and cultures; the Atlantic commercial system; immigration and slavery; imperial relations; the War for Independence; and the establishment of the Constitution. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3533 The Early American Republic
Examines developments in the first decades of the United States under the Constitution, including the establishment of the new federal government, political culture, and the rise of parties; the Jeffersonian triumph; the War of 1812; early constitutional issues; the Market Revolution; revivalism and reform; the rise of Jacksonian democracy; slavery and federalism; Manifest Destiny; and the war with Mexico. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3543 The Rise Of Industrial America
A study of major developments relating to the dramatic technological, economic, geographic, and demographic changes in post-Reconstruction America. With emphasis on debates over the proper role of government, topics include western expansion; the rise of big business; Gilded Age politics; urbanization and immigration; labor and Populist movements; imperialism; Progressivism; and the modern presidency. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3553 America In World Crises
Overviews the major twentieth-century upheavals that brought the United States into a dominant position in the world theater and transformed its political and social landscape. Closely examines the First World War and the peace; the “Roaring Twenties;” the Depression and New Deal; World War II; and the onset of the Cold War. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3813 Historical Research And Writing
An introduction to upper-level historical study that examines the history, nature, sources, and methods of historical investigation and writing. Includes guided practice and a major research paper to reinforce learned concepts and skills. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4323 Europe In The Age Of World Wars
Examines major events, ideas, individuals, and institutions in an era of total war, the most destructive in human history. Includes the origins, major features, and consequences of World War I and the peace; the Bolshevik Revolution and the rise of the Soviet Union; interwar economics, diplomacy, science, philosophy, art and culture; the struggles of democracy and the rise of fascism; the nature and culture of Nazi Germany; and the onset, course, and consequences of World War II. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4333 Europe Since 1945
Surveys the divergent paths of Western and Eastern European nations in the Cold War era and the opportunities and challenges presented by the fall of European communism. Includes post-World War II recovery and reconstruction; the onset of the “Iron Curtain” and Cold War; decolonization; the European Union project; national politics, societies, and cultures; the collapse of communist regimes; resurgent nationalism and the Yugoslav wars; and the challenges of globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era
Examines the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War with emphasis on the political, cultural, economic, racial, and religious contexts of secession; the presidency of Lincoln; major military campaigns; Reconstruction efforts; and the role of the war in American memory and identity. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 To Present
Examines American politics, economy, society, and culture in both the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. Major topics include Cold War diplomacy, politics, and economics; American affluence and the Great Society; the Civil Rights movement; Vietnam and Sixties protest; Nixon, Watergate, and Stagflation; the Reagan Revolution; Nineties prosperity, the rise of the Internet Age, and culture wars; and post-9/11 challenges. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4613 Selected Topics In History
Special history topics chosen by student or instructor. PR: PI.

IDS—INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

IDS 2103 Introduction To The Arts And Sciences

An introduction to the major academic disciplines through the reading of scholarly articles from each discipline and through discussions and interviews with faculty from these disciplines. Students write an interdisciplinary research paper and a personal/ academic/career plan.

IDS 3001 Interdisciplinary Studies and Vocation
Interdisciplinary Studies majors continue the vocational preparation begun in IDS 2103. Students will integrate their disciplines in a focused way, ultimately leading to a senior project prospectus that considers their vocational, academic, and career goals.

IDS 4813 Senior Project in Interdisciplinary Studies
Capstone course for Interdisciplinary Studies. Preparation of an interdisciplinary research project culminating in a formal paper and presentation at Academic Symposium. PR: Senior Status.

IDS 4893 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies
Supervised field experience in interdisciplinary studies with application of theoretical knowledge. Includes extensive outside reading and a written report. Responsibility for obtaining an internship lies with the student. The student must first consult the dean of humanities for approval of the internship. PR: Junior status.

IDS 4601 Senior Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
Develops interviewing, resume and cover letter writing, and networking skills, preparing students for post-graduation life. Students assemble portfolio for personal assessment and career planning. Should be taken the student’s final semester. PR: Senior status.

INF—INFORMATION LITERACY

INF 1011 Information Literacy
Introduces college level critical thinking and research skills which form the basis of information literacy. Includes practice in the planning and implementation of research, Internet and library database searching, evaluating websites, citing sources, and understanding and avoiding plagiarism.

INS—INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INS 1001 Introduction to International Studies
Introduces future GEO (Global Educational Opportunities) students to the requirements of a semester of studying abroad. Prepares students to travel in a safe, sensitive, informed, and academically fulfilling way. Also offers some biblical textual studies that relate to Christian cultural issues. PR: PI

INS 2123 Language and Culture
Teaches practical basics of the German language for use in everyday life situations in speaking, reading, and writing and gives necessary information to help students better understand Austrian culture in order to enhance the GEO Vienna study program. PR: GEO students only.

INS 2133 Cross-Cultural Experience
Taken as part of a GEO program, this class helps students to immerse themselves in their cross-cultural experience with informed observations and with personal interactions.

INS 3113 Studies in European Civilization
Examines major political, economic, social, cultural, ideological, and religious developments in European civilization. Emphasis is given to the history, prominent figures, and cultural sites of the cities and regions students encounter on the Vienna Study Program. This course is designed to take advantage of the travel opportunities afforded by the GEO international study experience. PR: GEO students only.

INS 4413 Aethetics
Discussion of philosophies about art and beauty, including contemplation of the visual arts in relation to Christian worldviews. Also listed as PHI 4413. PR: GEO students only.

MUE—MUSIC EDUCATION

MUE 2403 Introduction to Music Education
Designed to survey the major trends and developments relevant to the field of music education, the course serves as an overview of the nature of music teaching and the beginnings of preparing to become a music educator. Course content will include history, philosophy, competency, and content in music education.

MUE 3412 Instrumental Techniques I (Woodwinds)
Playing techniques for woodwind instruments found in school settings. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211 and 1213.

MUE 3422 Instrumental Techniques II (Strings)
Playing techniques for stringed instruments found in school settings. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211 and 1213.

MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical
Understanding the logistics and process of producing musicals in schools. Includes practicum in a local school working on a current production. Also listed as THE PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213 or PI.

MUE 3432 Instrumental Techniques III (Brass)
Playing techniques for brass instruments found in school settings. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211 and 1213.

MUE 3442 Instrumental Techniques IV (Percussion)
Playing techniques for percussion instruments in school settings. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211 and 1213.

MUE 3603 Technology In Music
Setup, design, and operation of computer music laboratory, including hardware and software appropriate to music production and education applications. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213.

MUE 4403 Vocal Pedagogy
Scientific and imagery-related techniques for teaching vocal production. Includes history of voice teaching. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213.

MUE 4423 Elementary Music Methods and Assessment
Study of methods and materials for use in the elementary music classroom with special attention to assessment of students. Includes a 60-hour placement in a local elementary or middle school. Course fee. PR: Pre-admission to the Teacher Education Program.

MUE 4433 Secondary Music Methods and Assessment
Study of methods and materials for use in the secondary choral or instrumental program with special attention to assessment of students. Includes a 60-hour placement in a local middle or high school. Course fee. PR: Pre-admission to the Teacher Education Program.

MUS—MUSIC

*All private lessons have fees of $400 per credit hour.

MUS 1011 Private Voice*
Private vocal instruction. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for level of study: e.g. MUS 2011, 3011, 4011. PR: PI.

MUS 1031 Private Piano*
One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for the level of study: e.g. MUS 2031, 3031, 4031. PR: PI.

MUS 1041 Class Piano
Group instruction in basic keyboarding skills, including scales, basic exercises, and simple sight reading, improvisation, and accompaniment. CR: MUS 1203.

MUS 1051 Private Guitar*
One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for level of study: e.g. MUS 2051, 3051, 4051. PR: PI.

MUS 1061 Private Strings*
Private instruction on orchestral strings. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for level of study: e.g. MUS 2061, 3061, 4061. PR: PI.

MUS 1071 Private Woodwinds*
Private instruction on woodwind instruments. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for level of study: MUS 2071, 3071, 4071. PR: PI.

MUS 1081 Private Brass*
Private instruction on brass instruments. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for level of study: MUS 2081, 3081, 4081. PR: PI.

MUS 1101 A Cappella Chorus
Choral ensemble performs from a diverse repertoire that includes extended choral works, smaller works from classical and popular choral literature, hymns, and patriotic and multi-cultural music. Daily rehearsal and extended touring required. PR: Membership by audition only. Course fee charged in the Fall, $100. Students have one week from acceptance to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

MUS 1100 A Cappella Chorus (Non-Credit)
A non-credit enrollment in MUS 1101. PR: Membership by audition only. Course fee charged in the Fall, $100. Students have one week from acceptance to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

MUS 1121 Autumn
Contemporary a cappella choral ensemble. Repertoire typically includes contemporary religious music, vocal jazz styles, arrangements of spirituals, popular song adaptations, and hymn arrangements. By audition only. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

MUS 1120 Autumn (Non-Credit)
A non-credit enrollment in MUS 1121. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

MUS 1161 Community Choral Ensemble
Choral experience for non-music majors who are interested in singing but are not able to meet A Cappella Chorus membership requirements. Students may arrange for membership in a suitable off-campus, community-based choral ensemble and receive one credit each semester. Subject to music department approval.

MUS 1171 Community Instrumental Ensemble
Traditional community band ensemble with percussion that performs a wide variety of concert music. Membership by audition only. PR: PI.

MUS 1203 Music Foundations
Entry level study of theory that emphasizes written skills related to rudiments of music, including scales, keys, intervals, and rhythm. CR: MUS 1041

MUS 1211 Ear Training I
Entry level study of aural skills: Interval recognition, sight-singing, and melodic dictation. PR: MUS 1203 or placement test. CR: MUS 1213.

MUS 1213 Theory I
Beginning part-writing and chord progressions. PR: MUS 1203 or placement test. CR:MUS 1211.

MUS 1221 Ear Training II
Continues MUS 1211. Triads and seventh chords, sight-singing in ensemble, and advanced melodic dictation. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211. CR: MUS 1223.

MUS 1223 Theory II
Continues MUS 1213. More advanced part-writing and chord progression. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213. CR: MUS 1221.

MUS 2101 Worship Ensemble Lab
A group lab experience to give opportunities for students to create a worship ensemble, and to practice leading the group in song creation and learning. Some experiences to include practical applications for chapel and other worship opportunities on campus and in local churches. PR: PI

MUS 2211 Ear Training III
Advanced study of aural skills. Includes harmonic dictation with more extended harmonies, including atonality. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1221. CR: MUS 2213.

MUS 2213 Theory III
Advanced theory, including modulation and extended chords. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1223. CR: MUS 2211.

MUS 2303 Music Appreciation
This course is a survey of the origins, elements, forms, history, and effects of music with a view toward enhancing the student’s understanding and enjoyment.

MUS 2413 Musical Leadership
Principles of musical leadership for contemporary and traditional worship styles, including leadership personality, group chemistry, physical skills of keeping time, song leading, group leading, and administrative skills.

MUS 3202 Keyboard Harmony
Improvisation of simple accompaniment using keyboard instruments. Includes interpretation of implied harmonies. Grade of B or higher satisfies the keyboard skills examination required for graduation. PR: “C” or better in MUS 2213 and four semesters of piano recommended or PI.

MUS 3303 History of Western Music Survey
Improvisation of simple accompaniment using keyboard instruments. Includes interpretation of implied harmonies. Grade of B or higher satisfies the keyboard skills examination required for graduation. PR: “C” or better in MUS 2213 and four semesters of piano recommended or PI.

MUS 3333 World Music
An overview of modern and historical music of the world, including its influence on culture and its effects on our modern world. Emphasis on introducing the world of ethnomusicology to the student. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213.

MUS 3343 Music In America
A survey of the history of music in the United States, including Native American music, European influences, modern jazz, and popular music. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213.

MUS 3353 Handel’s Messiah and the Bible
Examines Handel’s Messiah within musical and historical contexts. Also explores the work’s scriptural text, both in terms of its original meaning and as interpreted to apply to Christ, as well as how the music illustrates the text to enhance our understanding of the Bible. Co-listed with THL 3893. PR: Sophomore status or PI

MUS 3363 History of Musical Theatre
Survey of the forms, elements, writers, composers, and performers of musical theatre from the Greeks, through medieval musical plays, and the history of opera, to the 19th-century operettas, and the American musical theatre. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1213.

MUS 3403 Conducting
Basic conducting and rehearsal techniques for directing instrumental and vocal ensembles. PR: “C” or better in MUS 1211 and 1213.

MUS 4213 Arranging and Scoring
Practical techniques of arranging vocal and instrumental music for performance by individuals and ensembles of a variety of age ranges and educational levels. Emphasis on music education applications and popular software packages. PR: “C” or better in MUS 2213.

MUS 4601 Senior Seminar In Music
Capstone course for all music majors. Includes preparation for post-graduation life and music program assessment. PR: Senior status and PI.

MUS 4623 Senior Recital
Preparation and performance of an hour-long recital. Recommended for all who wish to emphasize performance in their programs. PR: Senior status and PI

PHI—PHILOSOPHY

PHI 2013 Introduction To Philosophy
Introduction to philosophers and philosophical ideas and exploration of the value and contribution of philosophy. Explores the ways that philosophy relates to and undergirds other disciplines, including religious studies, social studies, political and economic theory, and science.

PHI 2933 Introduction To Ethics
Introduces students to the basic categories and ideas in the field of ethics; develops a greater knowledge of the biblical and historical materials that inform moral discussion; develops skills with moral arguments found in contemporary (and historical) discussions of ethical concerns. PR: Sophomore status.

PHI 2943 Ethics For Health Care Workers
Introduces students to principles and methods of moral reasoning. Issues specific to medical decision-making are explored in depth, including end-of-life issues, choices in reproduction, children and bioethics, etc. Designed primarily for pre-health care majors but can also fulfill the General Education requirements for Moral and Philosophic Reasoning. Equivalent to PHI 2933. PR: Sophomore status.

PHI 3043 Diversity Seminar
A seminar, typically team taught, on a selected topic relating to issues of diversity such as race relations, non-Western studies, and multicultural dialog. Provides opportunities to study, experience, and practice diversity. PR: Sophomore status, PHI 2013, and PHI 3923.

PHI 3923 World Religions
A discussion of major world religions, beginning with “Basic” religions and covering Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Chinese religions. Places Christianity in the global religious context and discusses fruitful perspectives for understanding different religious systems. Course fee. PR: ENG 1123.

PHI 3933 Philosophy Seminar
A seminar offered with topics from the field of philosophy with the opportunity for students to develop heightened levels of critical thinking skills, philosophical discernment, and writing ability. Includes primary readings, reflective and research oriented writing assignments, and seminar-type class discussions. PR: PHI 2013.

PHI 4413 Aesthetic
Discussion of philosophies about art and beauty, including contemplation of the visual arts in relation Christian worldviews. Also listed as INS 4413. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS—POLITICAL SCIENCE

POS 2013 National Government
An introduction to the political dynamics and capital constitutional bases of the American government. Examines the three branches as they act in concert and in conflict. Several models of decision-making are covered.

POS 2023 Introduction To The American Legal System
State and federal courts; the Constitution, statutes, and administrative rules as sources of law; jurisdiction and avenues of appeal in both civil and criminal cases. Students read and brief current and landmark cases.

POS 2043 Criminal Law And Procedure
Major constitutional issues in criminal law and how individual rights are protected in the system. Discusses complex legal issues in the administration of criminal justice in the United States and critical analysis of demands on modern criminal justice agencies and practitioners.

POS 3013 The U.S. In The Modern World
Includes world changes as a result of WWII and the end of the Cold War, the role and influence of the U.S. on world trade and the new global economy, goals and problems of the United Nations, and the struggle for civil rights of women and people of color in the U.S. Emphasizes the ability to engage in library and Internet research and to communicate integrated lessons employing audio/visual and computer technology. This course is built upon key features of K-12 methodology. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4013 American Constitutional Law
Constitutional basis and dynamics of the Supreme Court’s lawmaking power. Students read and brief landmark cases. A research paper outlines major constitutional cases regarding abortion, civil rights, or presidential powers. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law
Roots of society’s relation to the law and historical and philosophical concepts. Details statutory and case law. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4913 Directed Legal Research
Emphasizes research of important legal issues. Under the direction of the professor, students prepare legal briefs and documents of their custom-made topics and present an oral and written report of their work at the annual Academic Symposium. PR: Senior status and PI.

SPA—SPANISH

SPA 1214 Elementary Spanish I
Basic vocabulary, grammar, and practice in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading Spanish.

SPA 1224 Elementary Spanish II
Vocabulary building and complex grammatical construction. Stresses spoken language and Spanish culture. PR: SPA 1214 or three semesters of high school Spanish.

SPA 2214 Intermediate Spanish I
Grammar review and continued emphasis on oral and written communication. Also, literary and cultural readings. PR: SPA 1224 or two years of high school Spanish.

SPA 2224 Intermediate Spanish II
A continuation of SPA 2214. PR: SPA 2214.

THE—THEATRE

THE 1001 Introduction to Theatre Studies
An overview of the requirements and expectations of theatre and musical theatre majors, including vocational development, portfolio building, and career preparation.

THE 1011/2/3 Production Practicum
Technical theatre laboratory experience. Assigns students to a technical role in a Rochester College theatre production: lighting, makeup, costumes, props, or set construction. Assignments based on experience and/or interest and job availability. May require up to 75 hours of work. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

THE 1021 Performance Practicum
Laboratory experience/credit for performing in a Rochester College theatre production. Selection for roles is based on audition. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
Theory and practice in the dynamics of group performance. Requires membership in touring performance ensemble. A Classical ensemble and a Pied Pipers ensemble are offered. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the registrar and are subject to an add/drop fee.

THE 1061 Unarmed Stage Combat
Explores a variety of aesthetic guidelines, safety principles, and practical techniques utilized in the staging of unarmed sequences of staged combat. Also listed as PED 1011.

THE 1081 Dance for Musical Theatre
Introduction to basic musical theatre terminology and dance techniques. Numbering accounts for level of study: THE 2081, 3081, 4081.

THE 1091 Dance Styles
Students select from the following styles: Jazz, Ballet, Hip Hop, Modern, Irish, Tap offered through Second Street Dance Studio. Course fee $162-192. PR: Placement Audition

THE 1103 Acting I
An introduction to acting theory and practice, including script analysis and performance of modern realism.

THE 1112 Introduction to Technical Theatre
Instruction in the basic skills, tools, techniques required for technical theatre including set construction, lighting, and make-up.

THE 2003 Theatre Appreciation
Significance of the dramatic arts throughout history from ancient Greek to Postmodern theatre; roles of playwright, director, actor, designer, and critic are explored. Fulfills General Education Appreciation requirement for students not majoring in Theatre.

THE 2103 Acting II
Continuation of the work begun in Acting I. Approaches to characterization for a variety of roles in classical theatre. PR: C or better in THE 1103 or PI.

THE 2212 Musical Theatre Workshop
Laboratory performance course in which students prepare selections from the musical theatre repertoire. Includes preparation of both solo and ensemble pieces.

THE 2222 Voice For the Actor
An introduction to voice for the stage as a primary instrument of communication, with special emphasis on the Linklater technique. PR: THE 1103.

THE 2232 Movement For the Actor
An introduction to movement for the stage using the body as a primary instrument of communication, with special emphasis on the Lugaring technique. PR: THE 1103.

THE 2603 Play Analysis
Introduction to formal analysis of plays for actors, directors, and designers, and instruction in research and writing for the theatre. PR: ENG 1123

THE 2413 Principles of Design
Application of art elements and design principles in a variety of scenarios. Focus on refining ideas for compositions. Course fee $15. Also listed as ART 2413. PR: ART 1413 or 1423.

THE 3001 Theatre As Vocation
A seminar targeting the practical skills needed to pursue a career in or related to theatre. Students will explore specific career paths and identify means to attaining them.

THE 3102 Advanced Acting
Explores advanced actor training methodologies, relying heavily on the Meisner Technique and Practical Aesthetics. PR: THE 2103 and PI.

THE 3113 Theatre For Young People
Explores cognitive and emotional characteristics of young audiences and age-appropriate dramatic material. Explores variations of dramatic literature for child and adolescent audiences. Discusses performance of literature adaptation as well as text creation from improvised scenes. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 3143 Theatre Ministry
Explores intersections of theology and theatre and includes practical application of theatre arts to formal worship service planning, outreach programs, children’s ministry, missions, and play production. PR: Sophomore status.

THE 3613 Oral Interpretation of Literature
Instruction and practice in analysis and oral presentation of various literary genres. Includes oral interpretation of such forms as poetry, prose, children’s literature, drama, and scripture. PR: COM 1013.

THE 3212 Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop
Advanced laboratory performance course in which students prepare selections from the musical theatre repertoire and includes preparation for professional musical theatre auditions. PR: THE 2212.

THE 3242 Acting Shakespeare
An introduction to Shakespearean acting with emphasis on scansion, poetic devices, builds, playing through lines and finding a physical and emotional life in the language. PR: THE 2103.

THE 3303 History of Western Theatre Survey
A one-semester survey of major historical periods of the theatre from the Greeks to the present. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to Renaissance
Exploration of major historical periods of theatre practice from the Fifth Century BCE until 1642. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to Present
Exploration of major historical periods of theatre practice from 1642 until the present.

THE 3412 Design For the Theatre
An overview of the design process, including scenic, costume, lighting, and sound design. From the first reading of a script to production, students learn and gain practical experience in the steps necessary for a creative design for the theatre. PR: THE 1112 or 2112.

THE 3423 Production of the School Musical
Understanding the logistics and process of producing musicals in schools. Includes practicum in a local school working on a current production. Also listed as MUE PR: MUS 1213 or PI.

THE 4102 Audition
Instruction in audition techniques for monologues and cold reads with strong emphasis on Michael Schurtleff ’s “guideposts.” PR: THE 2103 and PI.

THE 4113 Directing
Process of play direction from production concept to performance. Includes written play analyses, conducting auditions, casting, rehearsing, and working with technical staff. Students required to direct scenes or one-act plays, possibly in conjunction with a campus theatre production. PR: 6 credit hours in THE.

THE 42123 Advanced Directing
Practical directing project for Rochester College theatre production. Students work closely under faculty guidance. Course is offered on demand. PI.

THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
Surveys the historical relationship between theatre and religion including pagan worship, liturgical presentations, and mystery plays. Discusses current conflicting views regarding the role of theatre in the 21st century church, including drama in evangelism and in the teaching of children and Christian participation in secular theatre. PR: Any THE course and ENG 1123.

THE 4412 Advanced Design
Practical design project for a Rochester College theatre production. Students work closely under faculty guidance in one of the following: scenery, costumes, lighting, properties, or sound. Course is offered on demand. PI.

THE 4601 Senior Seminar In Theatre
Develops interviewing, resume, cover letter writing, and networking skills to prepare students for post-graduation life. Includes theatre program assessment and development of the portfolio. Should be taken the student’s final semester. PR: Senior status.

THE 4603 Dramatic Theory
Theoretical approaches to the actors craft from antiquity to the present. PR: Any THE course and ENG 1123.

THE 4603 Dramatic Criticism
Critical writing approaches used to analyze both theatre performance and dramatic literature. PR: Any THE course and ENG 1123.

THE 4743 Studies In Genre: Drama
Survey of ancient to contemporary drama with a focus on literary and formal analysis. Also listed as ENG 4743. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 4813 Senior Project In Theatre
Preparation of a major ceative or research project in an area of the student’s interest. PR: Senior status in Theatre or Musical Theatre Major. Capstone course in theatre.

THE 4893 Theatre Internship
Supervised field experience in a theatre context with application of theoretical knowledge. Includes extensive outside reading and a written report. Responsibility for obtaining an internship lies with the student. The intern must consult the faculty coordinator for approval of the internship. Capstone course in theatre. PR: Junior status.

THE 4613 Special Topics In Theatre

Special topics in theatre based on faculty or student interest such as a focus on a writer, a theatrical period in history, or a style of performance or design. Offered on demand.

Faculty

Faculty teaching in disciplines other than history, humanities, information literacy, philosophy and political science are listed in the respective sections of that discipline.