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Audition to join the theatre program and/or qualify for scholarships! Click Major/Minor above for details.

Academic Opportunities

Students may pursue a theatre major, musical theatre major, theatre concentration within the humanities or interdisciplinary studies major, or a minor in theatre.

Career Opportunities

Academic groundwork in theatre prepares students for careers as performers, theatre managers, stage managers, technical designers, theatre critics, writers or educators. Theatre training also provides an excellent foundation for a host of other careers, including radio and television, music, advertising, marketing, law, public speaking, and ministry.

Mission

The Rochester College theatre program combines a strong foundation in the liberal arts with a broad understanding of all facets of theatre. Students practice skills in acting, directing, writing, design, and stagecraft under close supervision by theatre faculty in an environment that encourages students to integrate their faith with their academic study. Our vision extends outward to the campus and local community in a quest to pursue truth and bring richness to life through the creative arts.

Support Rochester College Theatre

You can help support the theatre program with your tax-deductible contributions. All contributors will be acknowledged in upcoming programs and some will enjoy such amenities as season tickets.

Donate

Individual Donors

  • Helper ($1-24)
  • Friend ($25-$99)
  • Supporter ($100-$199)
  • Patron ($200-$299)
    • Two tickets to the show of your choice (or one ticket to two shows)
  • Sponsor ($300-$499)
    • One season ticket to all shows for the following academic year
  • Benefactor ($500 and above)
    • Two season tickets to all shows for the following academic year

 

Donate

Corporate Donors

Advertise in theatre programs and reach hundreds of people.

  • 1/4 page – approx. 3.5” x 2.5”
    • $25 donation (single production)
    • $125 for the RC theatre season (5 productions)
    • $150 for the RC theatre season and RC Shakespeare Festival (6-7 productions)
  • 1/2 page – approx. 3.5” x 2.5”
    • $50 donation (single production)
    • $200 for the RC theatre season (5 productions)
    • $250 for the RC theatre season and RC Shakespeare Festival (6-7 productions)
  • 3/4 page – approx. 4.5” x 3.5”
    • $75 donation (single production)
    • $300 for the RC theatre season (5 productions)
    • $350 for the RC theatre season and RC Shakespeare Festival (6-7 productions)
  • Full page– approx. 7.5” x 4.5”
    • $100 donation (single production)
    • $400 for the RC theatre season (5 Productions)
    • $450 for the RC theatre season and RC Shakespeare Festival (6-7 productions)

We accept cash, checks (payable to Rochester College, in memo section: THEATRE), and credit cards. Please contact Julayne Hughes at (248) 218-2149 or theatre@rc.edu for more information.

Thank you for your support!

MAJOR/MINOR

Theatre program auditions and scholarship auditions

Next audition date: Saturday, February 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Rochester College Theatre.

Can’t make that date? Video auditions are acceptable. Please contact Katy Busam for details.

Contact: Katy Busam at kbusam@rc.edu to schedule a 15-minute slot

Who can participate: Scholarships are for participation Rochester College campus theatrical productions regardless of major. Scholarships for theatre and musical theatre majors are available also. All incoming freshmen, transfer students, and current students are invited to participate.

Audition Requirements:

  1. Performance scholarships and/or program entry: 2 contrasting monologues totaling 3-4 minute
  2. Technical scholarships and/or program entry: Bring a portfolio/pictures/resume or similar artifact.
  3. Musical Theatre Applicants and/or program entry: Perform one 1-2 minute memorized monologue and a short musical theatre piece of your choice (at least 16 bars).
  4. All applicants will be given a short interview period with the theatre faculty.

Performance and Musical Theatre Scholarships: The recipient is expected to take a role or understudy in each of our theatre productions for the academic year.

Technical Theatre Scholarships: The recipient is expected to take on a major technical role in theatre productions in each of our theatre productions for the academic year.

 

BA/BS in Musical Theatre

General Education Core49
Foreign Language (BA only)6-8
Musical Theatre Major68
PRODUCTION CORE:

CHOOSE ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING EACH SEMESTER UNTIL 5 HOURS ARE COMPLETED (Repeat any given class no more than 3 times):

  • THE 1011 Production Practicum (repeatable)
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum (repeatable)
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting (repeatable)
  • THE 1071 Armed Stage Combat
5
MAJOR CORE: TAKE ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • MUS 1011 Private Voice (twice)
  • MUS 2011 Private Voice (twice)
  • MUS 3011 Private Voice (twice)
  • MUS 4011 Private Voice (twice)
  • MUS 1041 Class Piano
  • MUS 1203 Music Foundations (may test out)
  • MUS 1211 Ear Training I
  • MUS 1213 Theory I
  • MUS 3343 Music in America
  • THE 1001 Introduction to Theatre Studies
  • THE 1081 Dance for Musical Theatre
  • THE 2081 Dance for Musical Theatre
  • THE 3081 Dance for Musical Theatre
  • THE 4081 Dance for Musical Theatre
  • THE 1103 Acting I
  • THE 2103 Acting II
  • THE 1112 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 2212 Musical Theatre Workshop
  • THE 2222 Voice for the Actor
  • THE 2232 Movement for the Actor
  • THE 2603 Play Analysis
  • THE 3001 Theatre as Vocation
  • THE 3212 Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop
  • THE 3323 History Of Western Theatre: Renaissance to Present
  • THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
  • THE/ENG 4743: Studies in Genre: Drama
  • THE 4601 Senior Seminar In Theatre OR THE 4601 Senior Seminar in Music
  • THE 4813 Senior Project In Theatre OR THE 4893 Theatre Internship or MUS 4623 Senior Recital
57
CHOOSE 6 HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING

  • THE 1091 Dance Styles
  • THE 3102 Scene Study
  • THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to Renaissance
  • THE 3412 Design for the Theatre
  • THE/MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical
  • THE 4113 Directing
  • THE 4102 Audition
  • THE 4603 Dramatic Theory and Criticism
  • THE 4813 Senior Project in Theatre
  • THE 4893 Internship
  • MUS 3303 History of Western Music Survey
  • MUS 4623 Senior Recital
  • No more than 2 hours from MUS ensemble
6
Electives (BS 11 hours or BA 3 hours)3-11
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS FOR MUSICAL THEATRE MAJOR128

 

BA/BS in Theatre

General Education Core49
Foreign Language (BA only)6-8
Theatre Major50
PRODUCTION CORE:

CHOOSE ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING EACH SEMESTER UNTIL 7 HOURS ARE COMPLETED (Repeat any given class no more than 3 times):

  • THE 1011 Production Practicum (repeatable)
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum (repeatable)
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting (repeatable)
  • THE 1061 Unarmed Stage Combat
  • THE 1081 Dance for Musical Theatre (repeatable)
7
MAJOR CORE: TAKE ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • THE 1011 Introduction to Theatre Studies
  • THE 1103 Acting I
  • THE 2103 Acting II
  • THE 1112 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 2222 Voice for the Actor
  • THE 2232 Movement for the Actor
  • THE 2603 Play Analysis
  • THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to Renaissance
  • THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to Present
  • THE 3001 Theatre as Vocation
  • THE/ENG 4743: Studies in Genre: Drama
  • THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
  • THE 4601 Senior Seminar In Theatre
  • THE 4813 Senior Project In Theatre OR THE 4893 Theatre Internship
33
CHOOSE 10 HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING

  • THE 2112 Technical Theatre
  • THE 2212 Musical Theatre Workshop
  • THE 2222 Voice for the Actor
  • THE 2232 Movement for the Actor
  • THE 3012 Scene Study
  • THE 3212 Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop
  • THE 3412 Design for the Theatre
  • THE 3242 Acting Shakespeare
  • THE 3313 Theatre for Young People
  • THE/MUE 3423 Production Of The School Musical
  • THE 4212 Audition
  • THE 4113 Directing
  • THE 4212 Advanced Directing
  • THE 4412 Advanced Design
  • THE 4603 Dramatic Theory and Criticism
  • THE 4613 Specital Topics in Theatre
  • THE 4813 Senior Project
  • THE 4893 Internship
10
Minor (Required)18
Electives (BS 11 hours and BA 3-5 hours)3-11
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS FOR THEATRE MAJOR128

 

A theatre concentration is available in the interdisciplinary major. Click here for more information.

Theatre Minor (18 hours) – THE 1103, THE 1112, THE 3113 or 3323. Plus 10 hours of THE courses with no more than 3 hours from THE 1011, THE 1021, THE 1031, THE 1081, THE 2081, THE 3081, THE 4081.

Courses required for a minor cannot concurrently apply toward courses within the degree core, major, concentration or track. With department approval, students may use other courses, within the area of study, to substitute duplicate requirements.

COURSES

THE 1001 Introduction to Theatre Studies
An overview of the requirements and expectations of theatre and musical theatre majors

THE 1011 Production Practicum
Technical theatre laboratory experience. Assigns students to a technical role in a Rochester College theatre production: lighting, makeup, costumes, props or set construction. Assignments based on experience and/or interest and job availability. May require up to 75 hours of work. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the Vice Provost and are subject to a $25 add/drop fee.

THE 1021 Performance Practicum
Laboratory experience/credit for performing in a Rochester College theatre production. Selection for roles is based on audition. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the Vice Provost and are subject to a $25 add/drop fee.

THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
Theory and practice in the dynamics of group performance. Requires membership in touring performance ensemble. PR: PI. Students have one week from casting to add this course to their schedules. Requests received after the first week require approval from the Vice Provost and are subject to a $25 add/drop fee.

THE 1061 Unarmed Stage Combat
Explores a variety of aesthetic guidelines, safety principles, and practical techniques utilized in the staging of unarmed sequences of staged combat. Also listed as PED 1011.

THE 1071 Armed Stage Combat
Explores a variety of aesthetic guidelines, safety principles, and practical techniques utilized in the staging of armed sequences of staged combat. Also listed as PED 1011.

THE 1081 Dance for Musical Theatre
Introduction to basic musical theatre terminology and dance techniques. Numbering accounts for level of study: THE 2081, 3081, 4081.

THE 1091 Dance Styles
Students select from the following styles: Jazz, Ballet, Hip Hop, Modern, Irish, Tap offered through Second Street Dance Studio. Course fee $162-192. PR: Placement Audition

THE 1103 Acting I
An introduction to acting, including theory and application involving voice, movement, improvisation, script analysis, and scene studies.

THE 1112 Introduction to Technical Theatre
Instruction in the basic skills, tools, techniques required for technical theatre including set construction, lighting, and make-up

THE 2003 Theatre Appreciation
significance of the dramatic arts throughout history from ancient greek to postmodern theatre; roles of playwright, director, actor, designer, and critic are explored. Fulfills general education appreciation requirement for students not majoring in theatre.

THE 2103 Acting II
Continuation of the work begun in acting i. Physical, vocal, and emotional approaches to characterization for a variety of roles in the theatre. PR. THE 1103 Or PI.

THE 2113 Technical Theatre
Basic principles of stage design, set construction, lighting, properties, costumes, and makeup in relation to the production concept of a particular genre. Includes laboratory experience in a Rochester College theatrical production.

THE 2213 Musical Theatre Workshop
Laboratory performance course in which students prepare selections from the musical theatre repertoire. Includes preparation of both solo and ensemble pieces, along with a basic introduction to movement and dance.

THE 2222 Voice For the Actor
An introduction to voice for the stage as a primary intrument of communication, with special emphasis on the Linklater technique.

THE 2232 Movement For the Actor
An introduction to movement for the stage using the body as a primary instrument of communication, with special emphasis on the Lugaring technique..

THE 2603 Play Analysis
Introduction to formal analysis of plays for actors, directors, and designers, and instruction in research and writing for the theatre.

THE 3102 Advanced Acting
Explores advanced actor training methodologies, relying heavily on the Meisner Technique and Practical Aesthetics..

THE 3113 Theatre For Young People
Explores cognitive and emotional characteristics of young audiences and age-appropriate dramatic material. Explores variations of dramatic literature for child and adolescent audiences. Discusses performance of literature adaptation as well as text creation from improvised scenes. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 3212 Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop
Advanced laboratory performance course in which students prepare selections from the musical theatre repertoire and includes preparation for professional musical theatre auditions.

THE 3242 Acting Shakespeare
An introduction to Shakespearean acting with emphasis on scansion, poetic devices, builds, playing through lines, and finding a physical and emotional life in the language.

THE 3303 History Of Western Theatre
A one-semester survey of major historical periods of the theatre from the Greeks to the present.

THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to the Renaissance
Exploration of major historical periods of theatre practice from the fifth century BC until 1642.

THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to Present
Exploration of major historical periods of theatre practice from 1642 until the present.

THE 3412 Design For The Theatre
An overview of the design process, including scenic, costume, lighting and sound design. From the first reading of a script to production, students learn and gain practical experience in the steps necessary for a creative design for the theatre.

THE 3423 Production Of The School Musical
Understanding the logistics and process of producing musicals in schools. Includes practicum in a local school working on a current production. Also listed As MUE 3423. PR: MUS 1213 Or PI.

THE 4102 Audition
Instruction in audition techniques for monologues and cold reads with strong emphasis on Michael Schurtleff’s “guideposts.” PR: THE 2103 and PI.

THE 4113 Directing
Process of play direction from production concept to performance. Includes written play analyses, conducting auditions, casting, rehearsing, and working with technical staff. Students required to direct scenes or one-act plays, possibly in conjunction with a campus theatre production. PR: one of the following: THE 1103, 2103, 2113, 3213, 3303 or 3603.

THE 4123 Advanced Directing (on demand)
Practical directing project for Rochester College theatre production. Students work under close faculty guidance. Course is offered on demand. PI.

THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
Surveys the historical relationship between theatre and religion including pagan worship, liturgical presentations and mystery plays. Discusses current conflicting views regarding the role of theatre in the 21st century church, including drama in evangelism and in the teaching of children and Christian participation in secular theatre. PR: any THE course.

THE 4412 Advanced Design
Practical design project for a Rochester College theatre production. Students work closely under faculty guidance in one of the following: scenery, costumes, lighting, properties, or sound. Course is offered on demand. PI.

THE 4601 Senior Seminar In Theatre
Capstone course in theatre. Includes preparation for post-graduation life and theatre program assessment. PR: senior status.

THE 4603 Dramatic Theory Criticism
Critical writing approaches used to analyze both theatre performance and dramatic literature. PR: any THE course.

THE 4613 Special Topics in Theatre
Special topics in theatre based on faculty or student interest such as a focus on a writer, a theatrical period in history, or a style of performance or design.

THE 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
Survey of ancient to contemporary drama with a focus on literary and formal analysis. Also listed as ENG 4743. PR: ENG 1123.

THE 4813 Senior Project In Theatre
Preparation of a major creative or research project in an area of the student’s interest. PR: senior status and theatre or performing arts interdisciplinary studies concentration.

THE 4893 Theatre Internship
Supervised field experience in a theatre context with application of theoretical knowledge. Includes outside reading and a written report. PR: junior status.

SHOWS

2015/2016 Season

Click here to purchase or reserve your tickets.

Tickets are $5 for students, $10 in advance ($12 for Tale of Two Cities), and $12 at the door ($15 for Tale of Two Cities). Seating is general admission – first come, first served. For group sales (10 or more) or more information, e-mail theatre@rc.edu or call (248) 218-2149.

 

theatre5

 

 

Dancing at Lughnasa
by Brian Friel
directed by Robert Arbaugh

Fri-Sat, Sept 25-26, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, Sept 27, 2:00 p.m.

Thu-Sat, Oct 1-3, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, Oct 4, 2:00 p.m.

 

 

 

Dancing at Lughnasa is a beautiful memory play as seen through the eyes of a young boy, an illegitimate child of one of five unmarried sisters eking out a living in a small village in Ireland in l936. Their spare existence is interrupted by brief, colorful bursts of music from the radio that they acquired at the time of the festival of Lughnasa. Widely regarded as Friel’s masterpiece, this haunting play is his tribute to the spirit and valor of the past.

 

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Our Town

by Thornton Wilder
directed by Brandon Langeland

Fri-Sat, Nov 13-14, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, Nov 15, 2:00 p.m.

Thu-Sat, Nov 19-21, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, Nov 22, 2:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

Described as “the greatest American play ever written,” and winner of the 1938 Pulitzer Prize, Our Town follows the lives of the Webb and Gibbs families, residents of the small town of Grover’s Corners, as they grow up, grow old, fall in love, and experience the heartbreaks and wonders of life itself. Watch as the ordinary becomes extraordinary and learn more about what it is to be alive.

 

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Outside Mullingar
by John Patrick Shanley
directed by Dr. David Keller

Thu-Sat, Feb 11-13, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, Feb 14, 2:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

Is it ever too late to find happiness in love?  Can middle-aged farmers Rosemary Muldoon and Anthony Reilly – whose only inheritances are the stone walls of a resistant Irish earth, a painful jilting, a personal grudge, and a long-standing property dispute – find the resilience to risk the promptings of their hearts to find a life together “outside Mullingar”?  The author of Doubt and Moonstruck revisits his Irish heritage.

 

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A Tale of Two Cities: The Musical
by Jill Santoriello
based on the novel by Charles Dickens
directed by Dr. Catherine Parker

Thu-Sat, April 7-9, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, April 10, 2:00 p.m.

Thu-Sat, April 14-16, 7:30 p.m.
Sun, April 17, 2:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

A Tale of Two Cities is based on Charles Dickens’ classic story of love, revolution, and redemption. Two men in love with the same woman, two cities swept up in revolution, and one last chance for a man to redeem his wasted life and change the world. This new musical adaptation by Jill Santoriello premiered on Broadway in 2008 and was nominated for the Outer Critics Circle Outstanding New Broadway Musical in 2009.

 

 

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The Winter’s Tale

by William Shakespeare
directed by Robert Arbaugh

April 21-24, 2016

 

 

 

 

FACULTY

  • Dr. Catherine L. Parker, dean of the Rochester College School of Humanities and theatre department chair, has been with Rochester College since 1997. She completed her M.A. in theatre arts at Eastern Michigan University in 1999 and completed her Ph.D. in directing at Wayne State University. Catherine is also a 1996 Rochester College alumna.
  • Robert Arbaugh, MFA, assistant professor and production manager, has been with Rochester College since 2011. He completed his MFA in acting at Regent University in 2010. Robert is a professional working actor and director and serves as the artistic director of Uncovered Theatre Company.
  • Rachel Arbaugh has been the costume designer at Rochester College since 2011. She earned her B.A. in theatre performance at Regent University. Rachel is a professional actor and singer and also serves as the company manager of UnCovered Theatre Company as well as events coordinator of Rochester College.
  • Brandon Langeland, MA, adjunct professor, joined the RC community in 2011. He received his M.A. in theatre ministry from Regent University in 2011. Brandon is a professional actor, singer, and writer. Currently, he serves as director of ministry for UnCovered Theatre and as resident director of Alma Gatewood residence hall.
  • Eric Niece, adjunct professor and technical director, joined RC in 2015.  He received his BS in theatre performance from Northwest Missouri State University in 2008 and is currently pursuing his MA in theatre from Regent University.  Eric also works as a professional actor and freelance carpenter in the Detroit area.  He is the technical director for Uncovered Theatre Company.
  • Meredith Gifford, MA, adjunct professor, has been with Rochester College since 2013. She received her BFA in music theatre performance from Viterbo University and her MA in theatre education from Emerson College. She has performed all over the United States in various professional theatres. She currently serves as the theatre program director at Notre Dame Prep Marist Academy in Pontiac, Michigan.
  • Dr. David Keller, D.Min., also earned an MA in theatre arts from Villanova University. He is a semi-retired RC professor and administrator.  Dr. Keller has designed and directed over fifty productions for five colleges and universities in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Michigan.  He also authored Petticoat Surgeon, a reader’s theatre dramatization from the autobiography of Bertha Van Hoosen, the founding president of the American Medical Women’s Association.
  • Dr. Lisa Hodge Kander, adjunct professor, received her Ph.D. in theatre directing from Wayne State University. She has also studied at the Drama Studio of London, the Moscow Art Theatre School, American University, and Michigan State University. She has written, produced, performed, and/or directed hundreds of productions. She has founded two theatre troupes and is a recipient of the National Points of Light Service Award for her work with youth theatre.
  • Cindy Raffel
  • Chad Rasor, MFA, adjunct professor, has an MFA in acting from Regent University. He also has extensive training from the Society of American Fight Directors. Chad has worked professionally as fight choreography, actor, voice actor, technical director, and scenic designer. Chad also serves as assistant technical director at Oakland University and as scenic designer/technical director for Rochester Adams High School.

FESTIVALS

Loose Baggy Monsters: A Festival in the Arts and Humanities

Saturday, April 9, 2016

About Loose Baggy Monsters

High school students are invited to attend Loose Baggy Monsters: A Festival in the Arts and Humanities at Rochester College on Saturday, April 9, 2016. The festival features three workshop sessions led by Rochester College faculty, each employing a unique interactive approach to understanding Charles Dickens’ classic novel A Tale of Two Cities. Workshop sessions will be followed by dinner and a performance of A Tale of Two Cities: the Musical.

Registration Open

Register

Payment

The fee for the Loose Baggy Monsters Festival is $20 per person (teachers and chaperones attend free of charge).

There is an option on the registration form to pay via PayPal. You may also pay at the door by cash, check (made payable to Rochester College), or credit card.

Schedule of Events

1:00 p.m. ARRIVAL AND CHECK-IN
1:15 p.m. GENERAL SESSION
1:30 — 2:45 p.m. WORKSHOP SESSION I
3:00 — 4:15 p.m. WORKSHOP SESSION II
4:30 — 5:45 p.m. WORKSHOP SESSION III
6:00 — 6:15 p.m. WRAP-UP SESSION
6:20 — 6:45 p.m. DINNER
7:00 p.m. HOUSE OPENS
7:30 p.m. A TALE OF TWO CITIES
10:00 p.m. CURTAIN FALLS

Workshop Sessions

Session I: Loose Baggy Monsters

Why were 19th century novels like A Tale of Two Cities referred to as “Loose Baggy Monsters,” and what do they have in common with the modern sitcom? We’ll answer these questions and create a “mini monster” of our own.
Dr. Anne Nichols (Assistant Provost, Director of the Honors Program, Associate Professor of English)

Session II: The Revolution on Trial

Liberty or the guillotine? Which best represents the French Revolution? We’ll look at the setting of Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities and examine where it came from and why it developed. Then, through the perspectives of historical characters, we’ll put the Revolution itself on trial.
Dr. David Greer (Professor of History)

Session III: A Tale of Phiz and Boz

Hablot Knight Browne (who used the pseudonym “Phiz”) created the original illustrations for A Tale of Two Cities by Dickens (who once published under the pen name “Boz”). We’ll sample these illustrations, discuss printmaking techniques, and make our own prints with acrylic sheets.
Professor Zachary Watson (Chair of the English Department, Assistant Professor of English)

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Check back here for information on Theatre Fest 2016! Here is what Theatre Fest 2015 looked like.

About Theatre Fest

Southeastern Michigan middle and high school students are invited to attend the Rochester College TheatreFest. It features workshops with theatre professionals, faculty, and Rochester College theatre students on various topics including acting, auditioning, musical theatre, technical theatre, and stage combat. Workshops will be followed by dinner and a complimentary performance of Our Town.

Registration

Registration information for Theatre Fest 2016 will be posted when it becomes available.

Payment

The fee for Rochester College Theatre Fest 2015 is $20 per person (teachers and chaperones attend free of charge).

You may pay online via PayPal.

You may also pay at the door by cash, check (made payable to Rochester College), or credit card.

Schedule of Events

12:30 p.m. Arrival and check-in
12:45 p.m. General session
1:00 — 2:15 p.m. Workshop session I
2:30 — 3:45 p.m. Workshop session II
4:00 — 5:15 p.m. Workshop session III
5:30 — 5:50 p.m. Wrap-up session
6:00 — 6:45 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. House opens
7:30 p.m. Our Town

Workshop sessions being offered this year are:

Session I

SCRIPTURE DRAMA (Brandon Langeland)
The Bible may not always translate well to the stage. But that doesn’t always have to be true. This workshop session will teach you many techniques to effectively bring Scripture to life through drama.

STAGE COMBAT (Danielle Diehl)
Fights, slaps, hair-pulls and chokes – all those things your mother told you never to do – we’ll teach you how to do safely in this session on hand-to-hand combat. Please wear clothes in which you can move easily and comfortably.

Session II

PLAYWRITING (Brandon Langeland)
Learn how to bring your stories to life in your own unique way. We’ll discuss how to come up with ideas, how to structure your scripts, and, most importantly, how to find your own voice.

SCRIPT ANALYSIS
(Dr. David Keller)
How do we move from words on a page to a powerful performance?  Reading closely and listening intently to the script are two of the first steps in production, and are required of actors, directors, designers, and technicians. Wherever the focus of your interest in theatre lies, script analysis is an indispensable tool.

Session III

AUDITION TECHNIQUES: PREPARED MONOLOGUES (Dr. Catherine Parker)
Colleges and professional theatres ask actors to audition through prepared monologues. Learn techniques for choosing and perfecting a monologue that will help you land that scholarship or part you’ve always dreamed about. (NOTE: Participants are asked to bring 1-2 minute memorized monologue to workshop.)

CHARACTERIZATION (Dena Stewart)
Learn the tools to help you create a three-dimensional character by discovering clues in the text, connecting with your scene partner, and making good choices.

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Our Shakespeare Summer Camp and Musical Theatre Camp 2015 was a great success! Check back for details about our 2016 offerings.

Shakespeare 2015 postcard                           music theatre

PIPERS

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Working without sets or props and with little scripted material, the Pied Pipers’ performance style inspires children’s imaginations. Children enjoy active involvement in the theatre, so the Pied Pipers invite them to participate in the stories. Every child who comes to a Pipers show is greeted personally by a member of the troupe. Stories, songs, and poetry from around the world and across cultures help instill in children a love of reading, and appreciation of the arts, and a greater understanding of themselves and the world around them.

ONE … TWO … THREE … ONCE UPON A TIME…
Part of the excitement of a pipers show is that no two are alike. As the troupe performs throughout the year for schools, churches, birthday parties, libraries, and other organizations, they draw from a large repertoire to provide a unique, entertaining experience for each audience. The troupe offers a fresh and exciting performance that can be adapted to most audiences and venues. Although the Pipers’ intended audience is children, people of all ages enjoy their performance.

Want to book Pied Pipers? Click here to fill out a booking request form.

For further information about the Pied Pipers, please email cparker@rc.edu