Humanities

Academic Opportunities

Students may pursue either the Bachelor of Arts degree in Humanities or the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies. Students pursuing the baccalaureate in Humanities complete a core of humanities courses that includes an introduction to the arts and sciences; focused coursework in history, literature, diversity studies, and performing arts; foreign language literacy coursework; and a Global Educational Opportunities experience. As well as experiencing the breadth of training in the humanities core, students completing the baccalaureate in humanities have the opportunity to pursue a concentration of interest. Concentrations available for focused study include mass communication, general science, history, international studies, literature, literature and writing, mathematics, music, performing arts, pre- law, professional writing, religion and theatre. The combination of the humanities core and the focused concentration will enable students to be prepared and eligible for graduate studies in their areas of interest.

Students pursuing the baccalaureate in Interdisciplinary Studies select two concentrations for focused study, one concentration in the humanities and a second concentration in a broader range of arts, sciences and professional studies. Students also complete a core of courses in philosophy and liberal arts that allows them to explore, understand and appreciate the interdisciplinary connections between their concentrations. Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies also complete a modern foreign language literacy requirement.

Career Opportunities

The humanities baccalaureate degrees not only prepare students for rich personal and academic growth, but they also prepare students to enter into the work world with the competencies that the marketplace is seeking: the ability to communicate clearly and effectively in writing and in speech, the ability to think creatively and critically, the ability to analyze and solve problems, and the ability to work effectively and constructively with others. Numerous career options are described in the following sections related to the individual concentrations available to the Humanities and Interdisciplinary Studies majors.

BA with Humanities Major

General Education Core49
Foreign Language6-8
Humanities Major27
HUM 2103 Introduction to the Arts and Sciences
3
3000+ Western/American Heritage
6
3000+ Non-Western Studies/Diversity
3
3000+ Western/American Heritage or Non-Western Studies/Diversity
3
3000+ Literature
6
3000+ Performing Arts
6
Humanities Concentration24
History, Music, Pre-Law, Bible and Ministry, Theatre, or Performing Arts
Minor (recommended)18
Electives2-4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS FOR HUMANITIES MAJOR128

Interdisciplinary Studies

Academic Opportunities

The Bachelor of Science and Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies allows students to combine two areas of study into one degree. The different areas of study are tied together by a specifically designed Interdisciplinary Core. The interdisciplinary options also include a specifically designed degree plan for students interested in pre-med, pre-physician assistant, or pre-law.

Career Opportunities

More than ever, professional employers and many post-baccalaureate academic programs seek graduates who have diverse backgrounds in the liberal arts and the skills to think critically, communicate effectively, and perform a broad range of tasks. For this reason, the diversity of a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies uniquely prepares students for a number of different career and vocational pursuits. With the right combination of concentrations, the degree plan is especially designed for students interested in preparing for medical school, law school, or graduate school in philosophy, religion, theatre, or other liberal arts fields.
In addition, this degree plan offers students with professional interests an opportunity to develop a broad intellectual resource base as well as the reasoning, speaking, and writing skills sought by many employers.

Minors

Courses required for a minor cannot concurrently apply toward courses within the degree core, major, concentration, or track. With department approval, students may use other courses, within the area of study, to substitute duplicate requirements.

At least 50% of a student’s minor core requirements must be earned at Rochester College.

  • Art Minor – Requirements 12 hours from ART 1413 or 1423, 2413, 4123 (repeatable), and PHI 4413 and 6 hours selected from the following: JRN 2883, ART 3313, ART 3213 (repeatable), ART 4123 (repeatable)
  • Honors Leadership Minor – Requires 9 Honors credits in LDR 3653, SEN 2013, and THL 2013; 6 hours from HON 2014, 2113, 2213, 2314, 3113, or 3213; and 3 hours from an honors contract selected from the following courses: BUS 3003, COM 2223, JRN 4333, JRN 4313, LDR 3713, LDR 3633, SEN 3003, or SMG 4253 with a minimum of 9 upper division hours.
  • Humanities Minor – Requires 6 hours from COM or ENG; 6 hours from ART, FLM, MUS, or THE; 6 hours from GEO, HIS, INS, PHI, or POS with a minimum of 9 upper division hours.
  • International Studies Minor – Requires participation in one of Rochester College’s international programs through Global Educational Opportunities (GEO); at least 6 hours of the same foreign language; at least 6 hours of liberal arts courses taken in a GEO international program; 3 hours (which cannot overlap with one’s IDS core, major core, or the general education core) from BIB 4123, BUS 3033, COM 3533, HIS 3313, 3323, 4323; 3 hours (which cannot overlap with one’s IDS core, major core, or the general education core) from ENG 2413, 4413, GEO 3113, HIS 3423, MIN 2401/2/3, MUS 3333, PHI 3043, 3923.

Once the above criteria are met, the student must submit a proposal for his/her self- designed program, meeting the requirements outlined. Proposals must be outlined on the “Proposal/Rationale Form” (available in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies) and must be submitted to and approved by a committee consisting of the Dean of the School of Humanities, the Provost and/or Vice Provost, and one other appropriate faculty member that the committee selects. This process must be completed before 60 hours of credit is completed.

Concentrations

Art Concentration

ART 1413 Drawing I3
ART 2413 Principles of Design3
ART 4123 Art History (repeatable)3
PHI/INS 4413 Aesthetics3
CHOOSE FOUR FROM:

  • ART 1423 Drawing II
  • ART 3213 Fine Arts Studio (repeatable)
  • ART 3313 Painting
  • ART 4123 Art History (repeatable)
  • JRN 2883 Digital Photography
12
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

 

Business Concentration

ACC 2113 Accounting I3
ACC 2123 Accounting II3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • BUS 2403 Macroeconomics
  • BUS 2413 Microeconomics
3
BUS 3003 Business Communication3
BUS 3303 Business Law3
FIN 3203 Principles of Finance3
MGT 2603 Principles of Management3
MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

General Science Concentration

SELECT ONE Laboratory Science sequence (another sequence must be included in the General Education core):

  • BIO 1014 AND 1024 Biological Science I and II
  • CHE 1314 AND 1315 Introduction to Chemistry I and II
  • CHE 1514 AND 1524 College Chemistry I and II
  • PHS 2014 AND 2024 General Physics I and II
8
CHOOSE 14 HOURS:

  • BIO 2114 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
  • BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology
  • BIO 3214 General Ecology
  • BIO 3324 Microbiology
  • BIO 3334 Exercise Physiology
  • BIO 3414 Genetics
  • BIO 3513 Cell Biology
  • CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHE 2524 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHE 3514 Biochemistry I
  • NSC 1004 Earth Science
  • NSC 1013 Environmental Science
  • NSC 2204 Natural Science Field Study
  • NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters
  • NSC 4901, 4902, OR 4903 Special Topics in Science
  • NSC 4513 Natural Science Internship
  • PHS 2004 Astronomy
  • Laboratory Science sequence from above
12
NSC 4612 Senior Seminar2
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

History Concentration

CHOOSE THREE:

  • HIS 1313 Western Civilization to 1500
  • HIS 1323 Western Civilization, 1500 to Present
  • HIS 2513 United States History to 1877
  • HIS 2523 United States History, 1877 to Present
9
CHOOSE FIVE WITH NO MORE THAN 3 HOURS LOWER DIVISION:

  • HIS 2113 Michigan History
  • HIS 2213 History of the Early Church
  • HIS 2413 World History
  • HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era
  • HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
  • HIS 3423 Globalization and the Developing World
  • HIS 3503 Women in American History
  • HIS 3513 History of American Foreign Relations
  • HIS 3523 Colonial and Revolutionary America
  • HIS 3533 The Early American Republic
  • HIS 3543 The Rise of Industrial America
  • HIS 3553 America in World Crises
  • HIS 3813 Historical Research and Writing
  • HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars
  • HIS 4333 Europe since 1945
  • HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era
  • HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 to Present
  • HIS 4613 Selected Topics in History
15
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Honors Leadership Concentration

LDR 3653-HON Strategic Leadership Theory and Practice3
SEN 2013-HON Social Entrepreneurship3
THL 2013-HON Spiritual Formation3
NINE HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • HON 2014 Communication and Critical Thinking
  • HON 2113 The American Experience
  • HON 2213 Global Citizenship
  • HON 2314 Science as Human Enterprise
  • HON 3113 The American Experience: Advanced Studies
  • HON 3213 Global Citizenship: Advanced Studies

These courses are repeatable, so the course titles vary. The same course can be taken twice as long as the titles are different.

9
COMPLETE HONORS CONTACTS IN TWO OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • BUS 3003 Business Communication
  • COM 2223 Public Speaking and Debate
  • JRN 4333 Editorial Writing
  • JRN 4313 Feature Writing
  • LDR 3713 Leadership of Teams
  • LDR 3633 Conflict Management and Negotiation
  • SEN 3003 Case Studies in Social Entrepreneurship
  • SMG 4253 Facility and Event Management
6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

International Studies Concentration

Minimum of six hours of the same foreign language6
Six hours of liberal arts taken while participating in an RC GEO international program6
CHOOSE SIX HOURS FROM: 

  • BUS 3033 International Business
  • COM 3533 Intercultural Communication
  • HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era
  • HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
  • HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars
  • HIS 4333 Europe since 1945
6
CHOOSE SIX HOURS FROM:

  • ENG 2413 World Literature Survey
  • ENG 4413 Diversity in American Literature
  • GEO 3113 World Regional Geography
  • HIS 3423 Globalization and the Developing World
  • MIN 2401/2/3 Missions Outreach Internship
  • MUS 3333 World Music
  • PHI 3043 Diversity Seminar
  • PHI 3923 World Religions
6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

English Concentration

ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis3
CHOOSE ONE: 

  • ENG 2413 World Literature Survey OR
  • ENG 4413 Diversity in American Literature
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • ENG 3213 British Literature to 1800 OR
  • ENG 3223 British Literature since 1800
3
CHOOSE ONE: 

  • ENG 3313 American Writers to 1865 OR
  • ENG 3323 American Writers since 1865
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • ENG 2513 Literature and the Christian Faith
  • ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Fiction
  • ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry
  • ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
3
ENG 3613 Grammar and Linguistics3
ENG 4523 Advanced Composition3
Choose any upper division ENG3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Mass Communication Concentration

COM 3013 Communication Theory3
COM 3533 Intercultural Communication3
MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication3
MED 2513 Media Writing3
PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations3
MED 3003 Media and Society3
MED 3113 New Media Strategies3
MED 4943 Media Ethics3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Mathematics Concentration*

MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus4
MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I4
MAT 2524 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II4
MAT 3534 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III4
MAT 3614 Linear Algebra4
MAT 3624 Differential Equations4
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

*Students with AP credit in Calcululs must take 6 hours of the following: MAT 2233, 2413, 3303, or 4653.

 

Music Concentration

MUS 1041 Class Piano, MUS 1203 Music Foundations, AND MUS 1211/3 Ear Training & Theory I

OR

MUS 1211/3 AND 1221/3 Ear Training & Theory I & II

(must pass theory placement exam)

8
CHOOSE 4 HOURS:

  • MUS 1101-1171 Music Ensemble
  • MUS 2101 Worship Ensemble Lab
  • MUS 10X1-40X1 Private Instruction
4
CHOOSE TWO OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • MUS 3303 History of Western Music Survey
  • MUS 3333 World Music
  • MUS 3343 Music in America
  • MUS 3353 Handel’s Messiah and the Bible
  • MUS 3363 History of Musical Theatre
6
CHOOSE 6 HOURS MUE/MUS AT THE 3000 OR 4000 LEVEL:

  • Any musicology courses listed above
  • MUE 3403 Conducting
  • MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical
  • MUE 3603 Technology in Music 
  • MUS 4213 Arranging and Scoring
6
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Performing Arts Concentration*

MUS 1041 Class Piano, MUS 1203 Music Foundations, AND MUS 1211/3 Ear Training & Theory I

OR

MUS 1211/3 AND 1221/3 Ear Training & Theory I & II

(must pass theory placement exam)

8
THE 2212 Musical Theatre Workshop2
THE 1081 Dance for the Musical Theatre1
CHOOSE ONE FROM:

  • MUE 3403 Conducting
  • MUE 3603 Technology in Music
  • MUS 3303 History of Western Music Survey
  • MUS 3333 World Music
  • MUS 3343 Music in America
  • MUS 3363 History of Musical Theatre
  • MUS 3423 Productions of the School Musical
3
THE 1103 Acting I3
THE 2103 Acting II3
CHOOSE THREE HOURS FROM:

  • THE 3001 Theatre as Vocation
  • THE 3102 Advanced Acting
  • THE 3212 Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop
  • THE 3242 Acting Shakespeare
  • THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to the Renaissance
  • THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to the Present
  • THE 4102 Audition
  • THE/ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
  • THE 4113 Directing
3
CHOOSE TWO FROM:

  • MUS 10X1 Applied Private Lessons
  • MUS 1101 A Cappella Chorus
  • MUS 1121 Autumn
  • MUS 1161 Community Choral Ensemble
  • MUS 1171 Community Instrumental Ensemble
  • MUS 2101 Worship Ensemble Lab
  • THE 1011 Production Practicum
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
  • THE 1061 Unarmed Stage Combat
  • THE 2/3/4081 Musical Theatre Dance
2
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

*If Music is the student’s other concentration in the Interdisciplinary Studies program, the student must take 3 additional hours of ensemble and/or applied music and 3 additional hours in upper division music courses to complete the Music concentration.
*If Theatre is the student’s other concentration in the Interdisciplinary Studies program, the student may elect to take an additional 3 hours in THE 1011, 1021, 1031, or 1081 as part of the 18-hour block of core courses in the Theatre concentration.

 

Pre-Law Concentration

CHOOSE ONE:

  • HIS 2513 U.S. History to 1877
  • HIS 3533 Early American Republic
3
BUS 3303 Business Law3
MED 4113 Media Law3
POS 2023 Introduction to the American Legal System3
POS 2043 Criminal Law and Procedure3
POS 4013 American Constitutional Law3
POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law3
POS 4913 Directed Legal Research3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Professional Writing Concentration

ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis3
ENG 3523 Creative Writing (or three semesters of ENG 3521)3
ENG 3613 Grammar and Linguistics3
ENG 4523 Advanced Composition3
Choose from any upper division JRN3
JRN 2513 Media Writing3
PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations3
PRN 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

 

Psychology Concentration

PSY 2013 General Psychology3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • PSY 2113 Psychology of Adjustment
  • PSY 2223 Life Span Development
3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality
  • PSY 3233 Child and Adolescent Development
3
PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology3
CHOOSE FOUR COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING (at least three must be PSY; at least two must be upper division):

  • Any PSY (9-12 hours) OR
  • Choose one from SOC 2453; SWK 2013, 3003, 3103; MIN 3613
12
PSY 4921 Directed Readings in Psychology1
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Social Entrepreneurship Concentration

BUS 4813 Business Internship3
LDR 3653 Strategic Leadership Theory and Practice3
MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior3
MGT 3683 Small Business and Entrepreneurship3
MGT 3723 Nonprofit Management3
SEN 2013 Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship3
SEN 3003 Case Studies in Social Entrepreneurship3
CHOOSE ONE FROM:

  • COM 3533 Intercultural Communication
  • HIS 3423 Globalization of Developing World
  • MIN 2403 Missions Outreach Internship
  • MIN 3423 Issues in Culture and Evangelism
  • MIN 3623 The Church and Society
  • PRN 2613 Introduction to Public Relations
  • SWK 3003 Human Behavior and Social Environment
  • SWK 3103 Social Welfare and Public Policy
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

Note: MGT 2603 Principles of Management, PDS 2001, and PDS 3001 are waived for non-business majors.

 

Bible

BIB 3000 or above textual course9
BIB 2333 Biblical Study Tools3
BIB 2983 Biblical Inerpretation3
BIB 4394 Contemporary Issues in Hermeneutics4
CHOOSE ONE:

  • THL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I
  • THL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II
3
MIN 3813 Ministry of the Word3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Ministry Concentration

BIB 2983 Biblical Interpretation3
BIB 4394 Contemporary Issues in Hermeneutics4
MIN 2513 Theology of Ministry3
MIN 2613 The Congregation3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • MIN 3613 Pastoral Care
  • MIN 3333 Intro to Youth Ministry
  • MIN3813 Minstry of the Word
3
MIN 3523 Practical Issues in Ministry3
THL 2013 Spiritual Formation3
CHOOSE ONE:

  • THL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I
  • THL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS25

 

Theatre Concentration

CHOOSE 2 COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • THE 1011 Production Practicum
  • THE 1021 Performance Practicum
  • THE 1031 Ensemble Acting
2
THE 2603 Play Analysis3
CHOOSE 2 COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING:

  • THE/ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama
  • THE 4503 Acting Theory
  • THE 4603 Dramatic Criticism
  • THE 3313 History of Western Theatre: Greeks to the Renaissance
  • THE 3323 History of Western Theatre: Renaissance to the Present
6
Choose 10 hours from any THE courses in acting, musical theatre, technical theatre, directing, or design10
THE 3143 Theatre Ministry OR
THE 4143 Theatre and the Christian Faith
3
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS24

Courses

Course descriptions in disciplines other than history, humanities, information literacy, philosophy and political science are found in the respective section of that discipline.

HIS—HISTORY

HIS 1313 Western Civilization To 1500
Examines important events, people, institutions, and ideas in the foundations of Western civilization. Includes the ancient Near East; Greece; Rome; the spread and influence of Christianity; the Byzantine and Islamic empires; Medieval Europe; and the Renaissance.

HIS 1323 Western Civilization Since 1500
Examines Western development from the Protestant Reformation to the present. Major themes and topics include European overseas empires, religious reform, and warfare; the rise of science and reason; the French Revolutionary era; capitalist, socialist, and nationalist ideologies; industrialization; World Wars; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization.

HIS 2113 Michigan History
Surveys the political, economic, and social development of the state of Michigan from it’s pre-European history to the present. Identifies and examines significant events, people, places, and institutions in Michigan’s past to analyze their meanings and implications.

HIS 2213 History of the Early Church
Survey of the earliest centuries of the Christian church. Considers it’s backgrounds, it’s first-century origins, and it’s development and organization through the second and third centuries. PR: PI

HIS 2413 World History
Surveys the histories of civilizations, cultures, and world regions, and the interactions of peoples and societies over time. In each world region, the development of distinct ways of life, cultural expressions, and basic institutions will be examined to highlight factors which have produced both commonalities and differences in human societies.

HIS 2513 United States History To 1877
Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from colonization through Reconstruction. Includes European settlement and the Atlantic World; the American Revolution, Constitution, and early national debates; democratic and territorial expansion; slavery and the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War.

HIS 2523 United States History Since 1877
Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from the post- Reconstruction period to the present. Topics include the impact of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, rising power, world wars, prosperity, and depression; the Cold War; computers; and globalization.

HIS 3313 The French Revolution And Napoleonic Era
Examines the origins, development, and impact of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire, among the great transforming periods in Western history, highlighting institutional, ideological, and social change. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe
Examines political, economic, ideological, social, cultural, and technological developments in Europe from 1815 to World War I. Topics include the Industrial Revolution and its effects, liberalism and democracy, socialism, nationalism, and imperialism. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3423 Globalization And The Developing World
Evaluates patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development in the Developing World: the non-Western societies and states located in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Regional case studies focus on flashpoints within each realm and possible solutions to contemporary issues. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3503 Women In American History
Traces the status and contributions of women in each of the major eras of American history. Examines the roles of leaders and pioneers as well as the changing legal, political, and socio-economic status of the majority of American women, including minorities, and the struggles for suffrage and equality. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3513 History Of American Foreign Relations
Reviews major ideas, episodes, personalities, institutions, and interpretations of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the founding era to the present. Includes issues relating to the Revolutionary War and the early republic; expansionism; the Civil War; imperialism; world conflicts; the Cold War; and globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3523 Colonial And Revolutionary America
Examines the colonial heritage and founding of the United States. Major topics include European colonization; English colonial politics, societies, and cultures; the Atlantic commercial system; immigration and slavery; imperial relations; the War for Independence; and the establishment of the Constitution. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3533 The Early American Republic
Examines developments in the first decades of the United States under the Constitution, including the establishment of the new federal government, political culture, and the rise of parties; the Jeffersonian triumph; the War of 1812; early constitutional issues; the Market Revolution; revivalism and reform; the rise of Jacksonian democracy; slavery and federalism; Manifest Destiny; and the war with Mexico. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3543 The Rise Of Industrial America
A study of major developments relating to the dramatic technological, economic, geographic, and demographic changes in post-Reconstruction America. With emphasis on debates over the proper role of government, topics include western expansion; the rise of big business; Gilded Age politics; urbanization and immigration; labor and Populist movements; imperialism; Progressivism; and the modern presidency. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3553 America In World Crises
Overviews the major twentieth-century upheavals that brought the United States into a dominant position in the world theater and transformed its political and social landscape. Closely examines the First World War and the peace; the “Roaring Twenties;” the Depression and New Deal; World War II; and the onset of the Cold War. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 3813 Historical Research And Writing
An introduction to upper-level historical study that examines the history, nature, sources, and methods of historical investigation and writing. Includes guided practice and a major research paper to reinforce learned concepts and skills. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4323 Europe In The Age Of World Wars
Examines major events, ideas, individuals, and institutions in an era of total war, the most destructive in human history. Includes the origins, major features, and consequences of World War I and the peace; the Bolshevik Revolution and the rise of the Soviet Union; interwar economics, diplomacy, science, philosophy, art and culture; the struggles of democracy and the rise of fascism; the nature and culture of Nazi Germany; and the onset, course, and consequences of World War II. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4333 Europe Since 1945
Surveys the divergent paths of Western and Eastern European nations in the Cold War era and the opportunities and challenges presented by the fall of European communism. Includes post-World War II recovery and reconstruction; the onset of the “Iron Curtain” and Cold War; decolonization; the European Union project; national politics, societies, and cultures; the collapse of communist regimes; resurgent nationalism and the Yugoslav wars; and the challenges of globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era
Examines the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War with emphasis on the political, cultural, economic, racial, and religious contexts of secession; the presidency of Lincoln; major military campaigns; Reconstruction efforts; and the role of the war in American memory and identity. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 To Present
Examines American politics, economy, society, and culture in both the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. Major topics include Cold War diplomacy, politics, and economics; American affluence and the Great Society; the Civil Rights movement; Vietnam and Sixties protest; Nixon, Watergate, and Stagflation; the Reagan Revolution; Nineties prosperity, the rise of the Internet Age, and culture wars; and post-9/11 challenges. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

HIS 4613 Selected Topics In History
Special history topics chosen by student or instructor. PR: PI.

HIS 4813 Senior Project In History
Capstone course for the History concentration in Interdisciplinary Studies. Supervised research project on a selected historical problem, culminating in a formal paper and presentation. PR: HIS 3813 and PI.

HUM — HUMANITIES

HUM 2003 Appreciation Of The Arts
Examines the elements, forms, and styles of music, theatre, film, and visual art. Students experience the arts through performance and other forms of creative engagement.

HUM 2103 Introduction To The Arts And Sciences
An introduction to the major academic disciplines through the reading of scholarly articles from each discipline and through discussions and interviews with faculty from these disciplines. Students write an interdisciplinary research paper and a personal/ academic/career plan.

INF—INFORMATION LITERACY

INF 1011 Information Literacy
Introduces college level critical thinking and research skills which form the basis of information literacy. Includes practice in the planning and implementation of research, Internet and library database searching, evaluating websites, citing sources, and understanding and avoiding plagiarism.

PHI—PHILOSOPHY

PHI 2013 Introduction To Philosophy
Introduction to philosophers and philosophical ideas and exploration of the value and contribution of philosophy. Explores the ways that philosophy relates to and undergirds other disciplines, including religious studies, social studies, political and economic theory, and science.

PHI 2933 Introduction To Ethics
Introduces students to the basic categories and ideas in the field of ethics; develops a greater knowledge of the biblical and historical materials that inform moral discussion; develops skills with moral arguments found in contemporary (and historical) discussions of ethical concerns. PR: Sophomore status.

PHI 2943 Ethics For Health Care Workers
Introduces students to principles and methods of moral reasoning. Issues specific to medical decision-making are explored in depth, including end-of-life issues, choices in reproduction, children and bioethics, etc. Designed primarily for pre-health care majors but can also fulfill the General Education requirements for Moral and Philosophic Reasoning. Equivalent to PHI 2933. PR: Sophomore status.

PHI 3043 Diversity Seminar
A seminar, typically team taught, on a selected topic relating to issues of diversity such as race relations, non-Western studies, and multicultural dialog. Provides opportunities to study, experience, and practice diversity. PR: Sophomore status, PHI 2013, and PHI 3923.

PHI 3923 World Religions
A discussion of major world religions, beginning with “Basic” religions and covering Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Chinese religions. Places Christianity in the global religious context and discusses fruitful perspectives for understanding different religious systems. Course fee. PR: ENG 1123.

PHI 3933 Philosophy Seminar
A seminar offered with topics from the field of philosophy with the opportunity for students to develop heightened levels of critical thinking skills, philosophical discernment, and writing ability. Includes primary readings, reflective and research oriented writing assignments, and seminar-type class discussions. PR: PHI 2013.

PHI 4413 Aesthetic
Discussion of philosophies about art and beauty, including contemplation of the visual arts in relation Christian worldviews. Also listed as INS 4413. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS—POLITICAL SCIENCE

POS 2013 National Government
An introduction to the political dynamics and capital constitutional bases of the American government. Examines the three branches as they act in concert and in conflict. Several models of decision-making are covered.

POS 2023 Introduction To The American Legal System
State and federal courts; the Constitution, statutes, and administrative rules as sources of law; jurisdiction and avenues of appeal in both civil and criminal cases. Students read and brief current and landmark cases.

POS 2043 Criminal Law And Procedure
Major constitutional issues in criminal law and how individual rights are protected in the system. Discusses complex legal issues in the administration of criminal justice in the United States and critical analysis of demands on modern criminal justice agencies and practitioners.

POS 3013 The U.S. In The Modern World
Includes world changes as a result of WWII and the end of the Cold War, the role and influence of the U.S. on world trade and the new global economy, goals and problems of the United Nations, and the struggle for civil rights of women and people of color in the U.S. Emphasizes the ability to engage in library and Internet research and to communicate integrated lessons employing audio/visual and computer technology. This course is built upon key features of K-12 methodology. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4013 American Constitutional Law
Constitutional basis and dynamics of the Supreme Court’s lawmaking power. Students read and brief landmark cases. A research paper outlines major constitutional cases regarding abortion, civil rights, or presidential powers. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law
Roots of society’s relation to the law and historical and philosophical concepts. Details statutory and case law. PR: Sophomore status or PI.

POS 4913 Directed Legal Research
Emphasizes research of important legal issues. Under the direction of the professor, students prepare legal briefs and documents of their custom-made topics and present an oral and written report of their work at the annual Academic Symposium. PR: Senior status and PI.

Faculty

Faculty teaching in disciplines other than history, humanities, information literacy, philosophy and political science are listed in the respective sections of that discipline.